Tuatha Dé Danaan – Water, Earth, Air and Fire

June 9, 2013 Comments Off on Tuatha Dé Danaan – Water, Earth, Air and Fire

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Tuatha Dé Danaan – Water, Earth, Air and Fire

“Wise as the Tuatha Dé Danaan” is a saying that can still be heard in the highlands of Donegal,

in the glens of Connaught, and on the seaboard of the southwest of Eire.
Handsome, learned and experts in art and science, the Tuatha Dé Danaan–the Peoples of the Great goddess Danu

were supreme masters of wizardry and the bravest of all peoples.  Inasmuch
as they were wizards first and warriors second, their victories in
battle were gained by superior knowledge and magic.  Ancient legends
record their descent to Earth from the blue heavens and old Irish
literature abounds with their magic, spells and incantations.

Also called the “Ever-Living Ones” or ”People of the Sidhe,” the Tuatha De are the principal divinities of Ireland.

According to the Book of Invasions they arrived to Ireland in 1472 B.C., thirty-seven years after the Firbolg

(whom they displaced), and 297 years before the Milesians (also known as the Gaels or Picts), the descendants of the present day Irish.

But part of our story begins earlier–back to ancient Greece, long before the rise of the Mycenaens,

where a race of nomads known as the Pelasgians {(book on them)} lived. Tribal in nature, they were seafarers born

from the teeth of the Cosmic Snake Ophion, and the Great Goddess Danu.

Homer referred to them as the Danaoi and Herodotus would mention the capture

by the Phoenicians of the Danaan Shrine at Argos, then the religious capital of the Peloponnesus.

But it is the northern fleeing confederation of the Pelasgian tribes who
called themselves the Tuatha Dé Danaan that we follow now to Ireland.
First, they left their mark in Scandinavia, where they established the
Great Kingdom of Denmark and built four glorious cities, each on an
island–Failias, Gorias, Finias and Murias.
A wise man lived in each city whose responsibility it was to bring
knowledge and perfect wisdom to the young: Senias of Murias; Arias of
Finias; Urias of Corias; and Morias of Failias.  And it was in these
cities that the Tuatha flourished until their decision to move on to
Eire.

The Tuatha Dé Come To Ireland
Their reasons for coming to Ireland is shrouded in mystery, but be that as it
may, it was on Beltane (the first day of May) that they came down
through the air in ships that were clothed in a dense fog.

When the Tuatha Dé arrived, the Firbolgs had inhabited Ireland for 37 years.
Messengers told Eochaid, King of the Firbolgs, that a new race of
peoples had come and they didn’t know whether they were of the Earth or
of the skies.  But Eochaid wasn’t surprised, because he’d had a dream
foretelling a strong enemy would come against him.  So Eochaid sent his
champion Sreng to meet the Tuatha Dé’s champion, Bres.  The two heroes
compared fighting weapons and agreed that despite whatever happened in
the near future, they themselves would remain friends.  Sreng reported
back to his king that the Tuatha Dé would be content with one half of
Ireland, but failing that, there would be battle.

Eochaid decided to fight, thinking that if he gave up half the island, the
Tuatha would soon take the lot.  And so it was that a battle ensued.
Using their powers of wisdom and magic, the Tuatha Dé came up
victorious.  The Firbolgs were given their choice of provinces, while
the Tuatha Dé Danaan chose the Hill of Tara to be the political and
spiritual capital of Ireland.  And it was from here they reigned for
the next 200 years.

The Dagda–The High King of the Tuatha Dé Danaan

The Dagda (meaning “the good god”) was a father-figure and protector of the
Tuatha Dé Danaan.  Tales depict him as a god of immense power, armed
with a magic club, which could kill nine men with one blow, but with
the handle return the slain to life.  He carried with him the
“Daurdabla,” a magic harp of oak, which, when The Dagda played it, put
the seasons in their correct order and commanded the order of battle.
He also possessed two pigs, one of which was always growing whilst the
other was always roasting, and ever-laden fruit trees.  But it was his
cauldron–The Cauldron of Dagda–that was the most providential of all
his gifts, for it meant that no one would ever go hungry and life,
itself, could always be restored to those deserving.

The Four Treasures of The Tuatha Dé Danaan

The Tuatha Dé Danaan brought four magical treasures with them to ireland, one from
each of their four cities of wisdom, and each associated with one of
the four elements–Water, Earth, Air and Fire.

Dagda’s Cauldron

Associated with Water, the entrusted to The Dagda, was the Cauldron of the Gods–also called
the Cauldron of Rebirth.  It was a large cooking pot that never
emptied–capable of feeding an army.  No company ever went away from it
unsatisfied, for the cauldron was bottomless.  It could also heal the
sick and raise the dead, but only one who was righteous could use it.

Inis Fåil

From the city of Fåilias came the magic treasure associated with Earth–the Inis Fåil.  It was placed on the crest of the Hill of Tara, where all
High Kings of Ireland would be crowned for the next 2,000 years.  Also
called Lia Fåil, the Stone of Destiny, and the Stone of Virtue, this
stone would roar in joy so loudly that it could be heard in all of
Eire.  But it would only roar when the rightful High King of Ireland
placed his feet on it, and thus was used to determine if the contender
for the crown was worthy of kingship.  The stone also had the power to
rejuvenate the king and endow him with a long and peaceful reign.  A
story goes that Cuchulainn, a contender, split it with his sword when
it failed to cry out under his protege, Lugaid Riab n Derg, and from
then on the stone never roared again–except under Conn of the Hundred
Battles.

Claiomh Solais

Of the element of Air, and also known as the Sword of Nuada, The answerer, the Sword of Light,
Claiomh Sofias came from the city of Finias.  It belonged to Nuada, the
leader of the Tuatha D´Danaan and King of Ireland, until he lost his
arm in battle and became imperfect.  The sword was irresistible in
battle and had the power to cut his enemies in half.

Spear of Lugh

Originally forged in the city of Gorias and associated with

Fire, the spear was brought to Ireland by the god Lugh.  It was this spear
that won for Lugh the epithet Lamhfhada, the “Long-handed.’ Whoever
wielded it in battle would emerge victorious, and it was said to be so
intensely hot that it had to be kept point-down in a large barrel of
water (namely The Dagda’s Cauldron) so as not to burn up the place in
which it was held.

Powers

Some of the Tuatha Dé Danaan had other special powers–such as the gift of
knowledge in the god Fionn.  A drink, too, given from his hands would
heal any wound, or cure any disease.  Angus had the power of traveling
on the wings of the cool east wind, while Credne, the Smith, made a
silver hand for Nuada, which was properly fitted on his wrist by
Dianceht, the god of healing.  To complete the operation, Dianceht’s
son, Miach, took the hand and infused feeling and motion in every joint
and vein, as if it were a natural hand.

Gods of Life

The Tuatha Dé Danaan were the gods of life, of day and of the sun.  They were a
highly intellectual race that imported into Ireland the first Irish
alphabet, round towers, architecture, metal work and exquisite art and
music.  Through magic, merciless strength and wisdom they ruled.

Perhaps their power and influence is best described in the following, taken from the Book of Invasions:

“By the force of potent spells and

wicked magic

And conjurations horrible to hear,

Could set the ministry of hell at work,

And rise a slaughtered army

from the earth,

And made them live, and breathe,

and fight again.

Few could their arts withstand,

or charms unbind.”

While they ruled, it was a time of peace, and what some have called the golden age for Eire.

Milesians

After reigning in Ireland for 200 years, Ireland and thus, the Tuatha Dé Danaan, was invaded by the sons of the god Mil, who had come from Egypt

to Spain, and sailed thence to Ireland under Milesius, the leader of

the Milesians (later known as the Gaels or Picts).  When their fleet

was observed, the Tuatha Dé Danaan caused a fog to arise so that the

land assumed the shape of a black pig, whence arose another name for

Ireland–“Inis na illuic” or Isle of the Pig.

The Milesians, however, employed their own enchantments in return, and defeated the Tuatha Dé at Teltown and Donegal.

The Sidhe

When they were defeated by Milesians, the Tuatha Dé Danaan were not banished

from the land.  Instead, the island was divided between the two races

and the Tuatha Dé retired into the Sidhe–the hills, mounds and plains.

They do not die of old age.  They are not visible to humans unless

they choose to be seen. They have supernatural powers–for they are what

we call today the Fairies–and they are gods.  The Tuatha Dé Danaan formed an invisible world of their own.

The true Wisdom and Magic

Today the magic and wisdom of the Tuatha Dé Danaan are gone–for the Tuatha Dé

made the decision to hide away.  Their tech could not withstand an

enemy of force and, tired and old, their valor was not as strong as the

younger race.  So they left to become a myth that is shrouded in

mystery and legend.  The answers they found were not the true answers

for immortality.

Seek and find your path, do your spiritual discipline & practices. Look to find the answers the Tuatha Dé

hoped to find in the hills and mounds. Travel to heights beyond the

wildest of dreams in this or any other universe. Read daily–learn.

apply & grow spiritually something real for you that you embrace.

part 2

The Tuatha Dé Come To Ireland

Their reasons for coming to Ireland is shrouded in mystery, but be that as it may, it was on Beltane (the first day of May) that they came down through the air in ships that were clothed in a dense fog.

When the Tuatha Dé arrived, the Firbolgs had inhabited Ireland for 37 years. Messengers told Eochaid, King of the Firbolgs, that a new race of peoples had come and they didn’t know whether they were of the Earth or of the skies.  But Eochaid wasn’t surprised, because he’d had a dream foretelling a strong enemy would come against him.  So Eochaid sent his champion Sreng to meet the Tuatha Dé’s champion, Bres.  The two heroes compared fighting weapons and agreed that despite whatever happened in the near future, they themselves would remain friends.  Sreng reported back to his king that the Tuatha Dé would be content with one half of Ireland, but failing that, there would be battle.

Eochaid decided to fight, thinking that if he gave up half the island, the Tuatha would soon take the lot.  And so it was that a battle ensued.  Using their powers of wisdom and magic, the Tuatha Dé came up victorious.  The Firbolgs were given their choice of provinces, while the Tuatha Dé Danaan chose the Hill of Tara to be the political and spiritual capital of Ireland.  And it was from here they reigned for the next 200 years.

The Dagda–The High King of the Tuatha Dé Danaan

The Dagda (meaning “the good god”) was a father-figure and protector of the Tuatha Dé Danaan.  Tales depict him as a god of immense power, armed with a magic club, which could kill nine men with one blow, but with the handle return the slain to life.  He carried with him the “Daurdabla,” a magic harp of oak, which, when The Dagda played it, put the seasons in their correct order and commanded the order of battle.  He also possessed two pigs, one of which was always growing whilst the other was always roasting, and ever-laden fruit trees.  But it was his cauldron–The Cauldron of Dagda–that was the most providential of all his gifts, for it meant that no one would ever go hungry and life, itself, could always be restored to those deserving.

The Four Treasures of The Tuatha Dé Danaan

The Tuatha Dé Danaan brought four magical treasures with them to ireland, one from each of their four cities of wisdom, and each associated with one of the four elements–Water, Earth, Air and Fire.

Dagda’s Cauldron

Associated with Water, the entrusted to The Dagda, was the Cauldron of the Gods–also called the Cauldron of Rebirth.  It was a large cooking pot that never emptied–capable of feeding an army.  No company ever went away from it unsatisfied, for the cauldron was bottomless.  It could also heal the sick and raise the dead, but only one who was righteous could use it.

Inis Fåil

From the city of Fåilias came the magic treasure associated with Earth–the Inis Fåil.  It was placed on the crest of the Hill of Tara, where all High Kings of Ireland would be crowned for the next 2,000 years.  Also called Lia Fåil, the Stone of Destiny, and the Stone of Virtue, this stone would roar in joy so loudly that it could be heard in all of Eire.  But it would only roar when the rightful High King of Ireland placed his feet on it, and thus was used to determine if the contender for the crown was worthy of kingship.  The stone also had the power to rejuvenate the king and endow him with a long and peaceful reign.  A story goes that Cuchulainn, a contender, split it with his sword when it failed to cry out under his protege, Lugaid Riab n Derg, and from then on the stone never roared again–except under Conn of the Hundred Battles.

Claiomh Solais

Of the element of Air, and also known as the Sword of Nuada, The answerer, the Sword of Light, Claiomh Sofias came from the city of Finias.  It belonged to Nuada, the leader of the Tuatha D´Danaan and King of Ireland, until he lost his arm in battle and became imperfect.  The sword was irresistible in battle and had the power to cut his enemies in half.

Spear of Lugh

Originally forged in the city of Gorias and associated with Fire, the spear was brought to Ireland by the god Lugh.  It was this spear that won for Lugh the epithet Lamhfhada, the “Long-handed.’ Whoever wielded it in battle would emerge victorious, and it was said to be so intensely hot that it had to be kept point-down in a large barrel of water (namely The Dagda’s Cauldron) so as not to burn up the place in which it was held.

Powers

Some of the Tuatha Dé Danaan had other special powers–such as the gift of knowledge in the god Fionn.  A drink, too, given from his hands would heal any wound, or cure any disease.  Angus had the power of traveling on the wings of the cool east wind, while Credne, the Smith, made a silver hand for Nuada, which was properly fitted on his wrist by Dianceht, the god of healing.  To complete the operation, Dianceht’s son, Miach, took the hand and infused feeling and motion in every joint and vein, as if it were a natural hand.

Gods of Life

The Tuatha Dé Danaan were the gods of life, of day and of the sun.  They were a highly intellectual race that imported into Ireland the first Irish alphabet, round towers, architecture, metal work and exquisite art and music.  Through magic, merciless strength and wisdom they ruled.

Perhaps their power and influence is best described in the following, taken from theBook of Invasions:

“By the force of potent spells and

wicked magic

And conjurations horrible to hear,

Could set the ministry of hell at work,

And rise a slaughtered army

from the earth,

And made them live, and breathe,

and fight again.

Few could their arts withstand,

or charms unbind.”

Part 3

While they ruled, it was a time of peace, and what some have called the golden age for Eire.

Milesians

After reigning in Ireland for 200 years, Ireland and thus, the Tuatha Dé Danaan, was invaded by the sons of the god Mil, who had come from Egypt to Spain, and sailed thence to Ireland under Milesius, the leader of the Milesians (later known as the Gaels or Picts).  When their fleet was observed, the Tuatha Dé Danaan caused a fog to arise so that the land assumed the shape of a black pig, whence arose another name for Ireland–“Inis na illuic” or Isle of the Pig.

The Milesians, however, employed their own enchantments in return, and defeated the Tuatha Dé at Teltown and Donegal.

 

The Sidhe

When they were defeated by Milesians, the Tuatha Dé Danaan were not banished from the land.  Instead, the island was divided between the two races and the Tuatha Dé retired into the Sidhe–the hills, mounds and plains.  They do not die of old age.  They are not visible to humans unless they choose to be seen. They have supernatural powers–for they are what we call today the Fairies–and they are gods.  The Tuatha Dé Danaan formed an invisible world of their own.

The true Wisdom and Magic

Today the magic and wisdom of the Tuatha Dé Danaan are gone–for the Tuatha Dé made the decision to hide away.  Their tech could not withstand an enemy of force and, tired and old, their valor was not as strong as the younger race.  So they left to become a myth that is shrouded in mystery and legend.  The answers they found were not the true answers for immortality.

Seek and find your path, do your spiritual discipline & practices. Look to find the answers the Tuatha Dé hoped to find in the hills and mounds. Travel to heights beyond the wildest of dreams in this or any other universe. Read daily–learn. apply & grow spiritually something real for you that you embrace.

picture source

culture:  Irish

earth-air-fire-water-1

tags: Power

 

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